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In this post, we examine the crypto-token FunFair(FUN). We will outline the project according to the developers and the team in charge. Some people may find value or purpose on this crypto-project based on how it develops and what problems it aims to solve. The validity of development and claims must be determined by the judgement of the reader. From here on out, I will refer to the crypto-token as FUN.

Bringing the FUN in Online Gaming

According to the project, the goal is to revolutionize “the gaming industry by harnessing the power of the blockchain in the online gaming market.” FunFair are “delivering solutions which ensure that the future of online casino gaming is fun, fast and fair.”

FunFair is an online casino gaming platform. The platform is based on Ethereum blockchain, built in HTML5, 10x cheaper per bet than other platforms (gas costs), serverless, decentralized, and operators can publish in just two clicks. Transactions are operated with FUN crypto-tokens.

Initially, FUN was to be issued in two phases. First phase issued up to 1 billion FUN by July 7, 2017. And phase two with 3X the amount issued in phase one. It seems like the plan was changed to issue up to 12.5 billion FUN. However, 40% of total supply is allocated to the founders and advisors. Based on CoinMarketCap.com 4.3 billion FUN is in circulating supply while total supply is about 11 billion.

The project offers fair gaming using fate channels instead of random number generators. It has been shown that random number generators are not so random, so they are often referred to as pseudo-random number generators. To be more fair, FunFair offers gaming through the use of fate channels. “During gaming, we create instead a “Fate Channel”; a State channel with the added ability to verify a progressive reveal scheme by both parties, advancing a deterministic (“fated”) but unpredictable sequence of random numbers.”

In our podcast, I will comment and provide some views on this crypto-project that I think are different than the current interest in crypto-currencies. I will update this article with the podcast when it has been recorded. If you are interested in subscribing to our podcast, check it out here.

Warning and Disclaimer

This article covers a token or element in the cryptosphere. FinTekNeeks are not financial advisors and this is not a recommendation to purchase or sell this crypto-token. Please seek professional investment advisors before taking any action on a crypto-token. By the time this article is published, changes may have already occurred. Most tokens in the cryptosphere are complete scams that are get-rich-quick-schemes for insiders. Often, we cannot know this beforehand and only later discover this. A person should only trade with money that they’re willing to lose because losses are guaranteed. If you choose to participate in purchasing a token in the cryptosphere, you should do so with the full expectation of a loss and you should also expect it to change in a manner that does not benefit you. Finally, by reading this post, you agree that you’ve read our disclosure.


In this post, we examine the crypto-token Diamond (DMD). We will outline the project according to the developers and the team in charge. Some people may find value or purpose on this crypto-project based on how it develops and what problems it aims to solve. The validity of development and claims must be determined by the judgement of the reader. From here on out, I will refer to the crypto-token as DMD.

Is Diamond Forever

According to the project, the goal is to “become an ultra-scarce non-government controlled storage of wealth with software facilities that can increase that wealth over time.” As a digital currency, this is to allow people to send money instantly, securely, and near-zero cost.

DMD initial blocks and tokens were initiated with proof-of-work mining. The algorithm used is stated as Quark, with block times of 135 seconds, in their GitHub page. However, it is transitioning to full proof-of-stake mining with DMD 3.0. They offer two variations of proof-of-stake, either through wallet staking or through masternodes. DMD considers masternodes as proof-of-service, but it seems to be proof-of-stake with prerequisites. The prerequisites are to have 10,000 DMD coins and a static-IP address so that the wallet can be connected continuously.

The project states that they are transitioning to proof-of-stake 3.0 because some people were able to game the system by some worrisome behaviours where majority of shareholders were “disconnecting from the network for long periods of time, gaining enough coin age to stake and connecting again to claim their rewards.”

DMD is providing scarcity by limiting the maximum number of coins to 4.38 million DMD. To ensure this limit, the project is implementing “Treasure Digging” which allows burning of “old” DMD coins, i.e. Unspent Transaction Output (UTXO) aged over 10 years. Another feature that limits the maximum number of coins in circulations is that Diamond 3.0 transaction fees will be burned as a feature, according to the white paper.

In our podcast, I will comment and provide some views on this crypto-project that I think are different than the current interest in crypto-currencies. I will update this article with the podcast when it has been recorded. If you are interested in subscribing to our podcast, check it out here.

Warning and Disclaimer

This article covers a token or element in the cryptosphere. FinTekNeeks are not financial advisors and this is not a recommendation to purchase or sell this crypto-token. Please seek professional investment advisors before taking any action on a crypto-token. By the time this article is published, changes may have already occurred. Most tokens in the cryptosphere are complete scams that are get-rich-quick-schemes for insiders. Often, we cannot know this beforehand and only later discover this. A person should only trade with money that they’re willing to lose because losses are guaranteed. If you choose to participate in purchasing a token in the cryptosphere, you should do so with the full expectation of a loss and you should also expect it to change in a manner that does not benefit you. Finally, by reading this post, you agree that you’ve read our disclosure.


Value offers us one form of money that can be useful in any situation. Value may or may not be legal tender and it may or may not be gold in a situation, but if we have value, we may be able to use the value to exchange for other value. We’ll look at value in the social context of an argument, debate or disagreement among peers and how we can use the value of staying within the situation to increase our other values, some of which may be financial. Don’t feel bad if you struggle with this, as it takes a lot of work to improve this area of life. We make mistakes here too, so we’re working on this just like many of you are as well.

How To Handle Disagreement

Since we know that value comes from strong behavior, as we improve our behavior, we’ll be able to exchange value easier. We gain wealth from value when we talk to people we share disagreements. In general, most disagreements challenge us, so if we can’t handle a challenge, we’re weak and we’re in a situation where we’re not growing as people. Like Thomas Sowell communicates in the below video isolation will lead to poverty and backwardness. We don’t want this for ourselves. This means that we will sometimes meet people who communicate incorrect truths or statements and while we can correct them, we may not find it beneficial to do so. This tip involves the second situation – we disagree, but we have no interest in debating. How can we do this?

“Isolation almost invariably means poverty and backwardness” (4:50). Take it from Thomas Sowell – echo chambers are incredibly dangerous and will lead straight to poverty.

Do we want to be people with very strong and imposing views? No. People with very strong opinions, like the people who engage in witch hunts, often end up alienating many people around them. They don’t realize this at the time, but they slowly lose respect, friendships, and huge opportunity. They create their own isolation by being “better than everyone” and making it clear.

We are not better than anyone. We will never be better than anyone.

If we meet someone with a strong opinion, we should practice taking an assessment of the situation. The person’s behavior is communicating that their ideas trump people and relationships with people. Is that what we want? What value can we obtain from imposing our ideas on others, who may not accept these ideas? We can all agree and disagree, but being nasty to people when we disagree alienates us from others. One way to handle the disagreement is to say nothing. Listen to the person, take mental notes, and be friendly. When our chance comes to give our opinion, let’s give it with grace, so that we avoid being people with a strong view – “… That’s just my view. I’ve been wrong before, so take it with a grain of salt.” Ending (or leading) with humilty helps prevent us from coming off too strong to others. If we still feel like we came off too strong, we can either avoid sharing our views, or emphasize past mistakes with more frequency when giving a view.

Remember: we are not better than anyone and alienating others will directly reduce opportunities in life.

Listen. If the person expresses a view we don’t share, but we find interesting or that we consider may have some truth (challenging our comfort zone), let’s listen to them. We may learn new information. We may learn a new skill – such as learning to listen (a very rare skill). We may even connect dots we didn’t realize. Some of the “wrong” opinions I’ve heard at one time, have been true in other times, and all of them have taught me at least one other skill – from learning to communication style.

Since listening requires more discipline than talking, the inherent nature of listening builds value in the form of discipline. If someone expresses a view that we don’t share and we feel the urge to disagree, the nature of saying nothing is an act of discipline. Also, if we reflect on disagreement we’ve had in the past, how did expressing our view make us richer? Did it make us richer? Did it move us forward? Did we learn anything valuable? Did we become more disciplined? Most of the time, expressing a view is a waste. Still, most people will do it, so this gives us plenty of opportunities to listen and not speak.

Assess the situation. Suppose that we’re in a group of ten people and one person expresses a view that others do not share and an argument ensues. We immediately have a social experiment unfolding in front of us. Is it the view that causes the debate? The word choice? The way the view was conveyed? Consider how a simple situation, like negotiation, allows us to assess the same questions as well – is the person pushing back upset over the price only, or something else? We will face plenty of opportunities to speak and learning to assess social situations quietly helps us determine how we can best proceed when we’re in these situations.

Negotiation provides a great example of where learning to handle disagreements directly creates value – with financial value being a direct benefit, in some cases. In podcast 107, we’ll discuss the 2 negotiation tips that result in a 60-70% success rate with raises at companies, even during a recessionary period.

Most people will never assess a situation because this requires mental effort and it requires that we put aside our emotional bias. People love their emotions and their emotional reactions, as it these come easy with no effort. Anytime we feel our emotions arise, we should immediately pause and ask ourselves why we feel so stronly about something. We should not be people of emotions; as Sun Tzu warns, “Do not use arms because of your emotions.” Think. Assess. Reflect.

Final Thoughts

We can stay in our comfort zone. We can relax in our echo chamber. We can also challenge our self and grow our personal value. The best opportunities arise when we’re surrounded by people who may not share our values, as it makes you consider why we behave the way we do and challenges us to consider other approaches to our life. All of us have a long journey to perfect ourselves in this area, and it’s a journey that will enrich us beyond just financial wealth.


When we look at great leaders throughout history, Caesar Augustus (referred to as Octavius in this post) ranks as one of the top leaders in history. Born and raised during a challenging transition in the Roman Era, as Rome devolved from a republic to an empire and faced numerous civil wars and challenges, Octavius worked to fight the decline of the Roman Era, even though decline is inevitable after a period of prosperity. Octavius succeeded in his lifetime by preventing Rome’s decline and leading to a period called Pax Romana. Unlike Marcus Aurelius, Octavius helped return Rome to its glory for a significant period after his death (over 200 years), while Aurelius and his policies were responsible for the collapse of the Western Roman Empire.

The Series

  1. The Poverty of Witch Hunts: Growing Character Through Biographies
  2. 4 Financial Lessons From Alexander Suvorov
  3. 4 Financial Lessons From Genghis Khan
  4. 4 Financial Lessons From John D. Rockefeller
  5. 4 Financial Lessons From Yuri Bezmenov
  6. The Full Series

The Lessons

1. Difficulty creates advantage. The Roman Empire existed only as part of the larger Roman Era. Rome grew from a small agricultural community of young outcasts to a kingdom (at first under the control of non-Roman leaders) to a later Republic. Octavius’ life saw the decline and end of the Republic – no system lasts forever. Octavius became the first emperor of the Roman Empire after the conflict grew between the former aristocracy and the general public. The aristocracy did not want to lose, while the general public grew tired of the aristocratic oppression. While the Roman Republic had offered a superior system for its time, no system lasts forever, and the transition from Republic to Empire resulted in civil war. Initially, Octavius battled aristocratic families from the Roman Republic before facing off against Mark Antony. While the times challenged Octavius – as he was the underdog in the conflict, it also helped him grow to become one of history’s most respected leaders.

Difficulty sucks, or it seems to suck, but it forces us to grow character that we wouldn’t grow on our own. We don’t succeed because we have advantages; it’s the lack of advantage that encourages us to press on beyond our capacity. Were you born in poverty? Good news – you have an advantage because you see what most people need that others from wealthier backgrounds can’t. Do you have a massive amount of student loans? Good, because when you pay them off quickly, your story will carry more power than a story about a person who had very little. The more you struggle, the more your story will connect and resonate with others. Your difficulty becomes your advantage.

2. Mentor with people better than yourself. Octavius learned many skills from Julius Caesar, one major lesson which came from Caesar’s death. Octavius started further ahead of most leaders in his time because he learned skills at a young age from a mentor. When we look at what he accomplished and how he was able to overcome major problems, consider the early impact of having a mentor who had also faced difficult challenges (Octavius succeeded further than Julius Caesar).

A conversation or answer from a wise man can be better than a book on the entire topic. In some cases, the answer is a better use of time. Consider that some people will spend 10 to 20 hours trying to answer a personal challenge in their life, when a discussion with a mentor might cost them less than 10 minutes. If they made median individual income, 10 hours alone researching a solution for their problem would have cost them more than $100. Most people do not consider their time this way, which is why many people waste decades of their life “learning” when it would have only taken a year or so. If you want to make your time go further, find and use mentors, as the cost may be less than the time you spend without them.

3. Your friends reflect an image of you. Octavius befriended and was fiercely loyal to one of the great generals in history – Marcus Agrippa. Agrippa didn’t just help Octavius in battle by defeating numerous enemies while being the underdog, he shared Octavius’ vision of Rome returning to its glory. Agrippa helped build numerous structures in Rome while he wasn’t fighting. In other words, unlike what we expect in a military industrial complex (“we need enemies!”), Agrippa wanted to contribute to Rome outside of empire expansion and battle victories. Roman infrastructure increased, which increased Roman’s standard of living, helping them be more satisfied with Octavius.

Let’s take an honest look at who we befriend: these people speak volumes about who we are. Octavius chose Agrippa who shared his vision and values while being loyal to him. Consider two opposite people: one person who values his time and one person who doesn’t value his time – how can these two different people accomplish things together when they don’t share the same values? This is especially true with close and intimate relationships, such as marriage. If one spouse is frugal while the other spouse is a spendthrift, we can expect to see a significant amount of conflict.

Remember, money reflects vision because money always follows character. How do your friends value their money? How does your significant other value his money? How do the people you’re closest to value their money?

4. Success requires the basics. Like the Chinese civilization, the early Roman Era emphasized marriage and family as a requirement for success. When Rome began its decline, it stepped away from the basic unit and Octavius was quick to return marriage and family to the front of Roman life by adjusting laws that encouraged both. Marriage and family give people a buy-in to the culture where they live. In the desire to see their children succeed, people work to make their culture succeed. Octavius understood this, as did the early Romans. We can even see this today when we compare married people with children to single people – married people are much more productive than single people, and the competition isn’t even close. Even the anti-marriage WaPo saw this with married men versus single men:

This translates into a substantial marriage premium for men. On average, young married men, aged 28-30, make $15,900 more than their single peers, and married men aged 44-46 make $18,800 more than their single peers.

That’s even after controlling for differences in education, race, ethnicity, regional unemployment, and scores on a test of general knowledge.

Marriage makes a bigger difference for success than education. Family also increases this financial premium. This highlights the brilliance of Octavius: while being strong and wise, he still grasped the value of the basics, which are easy to overlook as a society becomes more complex and successful. If productivity in a society is declining, the reason is obvious: the society has moved away from the basics.

We will never succeed in finance without the basics: these are basic for a reason. As we develop ourselves, we may engage in a self-delusion that the basics don’t matter, but they actually matter more, since we’re not fighting our own nature. A basic principle of financial success is discipline: just because we become billionaires doesn’t mean we can now act undisciplined – we must continue the basics of discipline throughout our life. Like Octavius understood, we must never think we are wiser than the basics. A fool becomes self-deluded with knowledge whereas a wise man humbly recognizes the values of the basics.

Conclusion

We find it ironic that Western academics praise Marcus Aurelius, even though he and his destructive policies contributed to the collapse of his empire and the rise of the Eastern Roman Empire. For an example, his hostility toward the Judeo-Christian religious tradition led to the migration of Judeo-Christians East, which later helped contribute to the rise of the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantine). By contrast, Octavius faced more challenges than Aurelius and yet lead the Roman Empire to one of its greatest periods in the Roman Era. When people think of Roman’s greatness, they often imagine a period during or right after Octavius. Considering that the Roman Republic could have easily collapsed to never return, Octavius’ work made Rome one of the greatest eras in human history as far as lengthening the time the Roman Era lasted.


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